UL Instruction   The basics of scholarly publishing   Copyright   Moral rights

Moral rights

  1. Even after assignment of his copyright, the author of a work has the following rights:

  2. a the right to oppose the communication to the public of the work without acknowledgement of his name or other indication as author, unless such opposition would be unreasonable;

    b the right to oppose the communication to the public of the work under a name other than his own, and any alteration in the name of the work or the indication of the author, in so far as it appears on or in the work or has been communicated to the public in connection with the work;

    c the right to oppose any other alteration of the work, unless the nature of the alteration is such that opposition would be unreasonable;  

    d the right to oppose any distortion, mutilation or other impairment of the work that could be prejudicial to the name or reputation of the author or to his dignity as such.

  3. Upon the death of the author, the rights referred to in paragraph 1 shall belong, until the expiry of the copyright, to the person designated by the author in his last will and testament or in a codicil thereto.

  4. The right referred to in paragraph 1, sub a, may be waived. The rights referred to in sub b and c may be waived in so far as alterations to the work or its title are concerned.

  5. If the author of the work has assigned his copyright, he shall continue to be entitled to make such alterations to the work as he may make in good faith in accordance with social custom. As long as copyright subsists, the same right shall belong to the person designated by the author in his last will and testament or in a codicil thereto, if it may reasonably be assumed that the author would have approved such alterations.


*Unofficial translation of Copyright Act from the Ministry of Justice http://www.ivir.nl/legislation/nl/copyrightact1912_unofficial.pdf. Article 25