Powers

The powers of the University Council are specified in the Higher Education and Research Act. The basic principle is that the Executive Board, generally in consultation with the faculties, manages the university. Due to the specified powers the University Council can exert influence on decisions made by the Executive Board. On many topics the University Council has the right of consent or the right to advise. Additionally, with regard to all topics the Council has the right to be informed, right of initiative and the right to be heard.

Examples of the Council's influence

University Council rejects new financial allocation model
According to the Council, this so-called allocation model is not transparent enough yet and is overly focussed on returns.
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Boris Pulskens en Louise van Koppen
"The Executive Board really rallied to the cause."
Student members Boris Pulskens and Louise van Koppen were perhaps the loudest voices in the University Council last year, when it came to sustainability. But what exactly have they achieved?
Read the interview
Code of Conduct for Rotterdam student associations.
The University Council insisted that Rotterdam student associations signed a Code of Conduct, to guarantee a safe hazing period.
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Vegetarian lunches become the norm at EUR.
The Erasmus University faculties have all adopted an initiative of the University Council to make vegetarian products the standard option for lunch orders.
Read more

Right of consent

Before a decision is taken the Executive Board must request the University Council's consent on the following issues:

    • The EUR strategic plan
    • The institutional plan
    • The main elements of the budget
    • The structure of the quality assurance system
    • The Student Charter
    • The administrative and management regulations
    • The health, safety and welfare regulations
    • The University Council regulations
    • The profiling fund

    The Council shall assess the proposed decision of the Executive Board and determine whether the interests of employees and students are not harmed as a result of this decision.

    Right to advise

    For many topics the Executive Board must submit proposals to the University Council to obtain their advice on specific decisions. The Council can then make its position clear by advising the Board. This can mean that the Council advises changes to be made to the proposed plans (or parts of the plan).

    The Executive Board is not required to follow this advice, but can only issue a definitive decision when the University Council has issued its advice on this decision. It is therefore important for the Council to convince the Executive Board using persuasive arguments that modification of the plans shall lead to better outcomes for the university. The rights to advise are firstly listed extensively in the Higher Education and Scientific Research Act, but ultimately the University Council has the right to issue advice on the “the proper course of business” at the University. The Executive Board cannot simply ignore advice from the University Council; this must be substantiated with arguments. If the University Council does not modify the advice and a difference of opinion persists, the Council can implement a dispute settlement procedure. For example, in the recent period the Council was asked to issue advice with regard to the topics 'Nominal is Normal', Campus under Development, tuition fees and the policy regarding scientific integrity.

    Other rights

    The right to be informed implies that the University Council has the right to all information that is required to carry out its work. The Council can therefore request information on practically any topic from the Executive Board.

    Due to the right of initiative the University Council can make proposals to the Executive Board whenever it pleases as long as the proposals are well-founded and somewhat appropriate within the context of the central policy of the EUR. In this way the Council itself can also improve concrete issues at the university. For example, on many occasions the University Council has advocated the realisation of more study areas. This initiative was eventually picked up by the Executive Board and is now part of the large-scale renovation efforts.

    Finally, the University Council has the right to be heard before decisions are taken. Only after the Council feels that its opinion has been taken into consideration can such a decision be taken definitively. An example of this is the Council's right to be heard during the appointment of a new Rector Magnificus.

    The right to be informed implies that the University Council has the right to all information that is required to carry out its work. The Council can therefore request information on practically any topic from the Executive Board. Due to the right of initiative the University Council can make proposals to the Executive Board whenever it pleases as long as the proposals are well-founded and somewhat appropriate within the context of the central policy of the EUR. In this way the Council itself can also improve concrete issues at the university. For example, on many occasions the University Council has advocated the realisation of more study areas. This initiative was eventually picked up by the Executive Board and is now part of the large-scale renovation efforts. Finally, the University Council has the right to be heard before decisions are taken. Only after the Council feels that its opinion has been taken into consideration can such a decision be taken definitively. An example of this is the Council's right to be heard during the appointment of a new Rector Magnificus.