Frequently Asked Questions

Open Access is a vast and complicated topic. Licenses, copyright, peer review, publishing, policies, and differences around the world and across disciplines. It is okay not to know everything.

General

Gold Open Access: You publish in a fully Open Access journal that does not charge subscription fees for reading access. These journals charge a publication fee (APC) to the author. These costs are usually covered by the author’s research funder or employer.

Hybrid Open Access: You publish in a traditional subscription journal that offers Open Access publication for individual articles on payment (APC). These costs are usually covered by the author’s research funder or employer.

Green Open Access: You publish in a traditional subscription journal and self-archive a version of your publication in a trusted Open Access repository, such as RePub. Publications can be archived upon publication or after, depending on the journal’s policy. It is often permitted to self-archive the author’s final version after an embargo period. The Sherpa Romeo database can provide basic information on the extent to which articles from academic journals may be archived, as well as any embargo periods.

Diamond Open Access: You publish in a fully Open Access journal or platform that does not charge any publication fees (APCs). The costs of publishing and hosting are borne by one or more organizations, associations, or networks.

All researchers at Erasmus University and Erasmus Medical Center are asked to make their short scientific work Open Access, either by publishing in an Open Access journal or by depositing the final author’s version of their work in the institutional repository, Pure

Most research funding organizations, including NOW, ZonMw and the European Commission, require publications resulting from their grants to be published Open Access.

The Sherpa Juliet database provides information on funding organizations’ policies and their requirements on Open Access, publication and data archiving.

Simply add a full text via Quick Submit or manual registration. See: Userguide Pure for Researchers.

Finances

The Erasmus Journal Browser allows you to check in which journals you can publish for free or with a discount. You can search the database by journal name or by subject.

NWO
Publication costs should be included in the budget of the project proposal. By using the budget module for 'material costs'. Note: Since 2015 NWO only reimburses the costs for publishing in full gold Open Access journals (registered in DOAJ). Article Processing Charges (APC’s) for publication in hybrid journals will not be reimbursed. NWO has launched a special funding scheme for Open Access books.

Horizon 2020
Publication costs are eligible for reimbursement during the duration of the project as part of the overall project budget.

ERC Grant
The costs of Gold Open Access publications are eligible costs that can be charged against ERC grants, provided the costs are incurred during the duration of the project.

If the affiliation with EUR is mentioned in the article and you were employed by EUR at the moment of submission, you are still eligible for a Publisher Deal.

Copyright and Licences

When publishing with an Open Access journal, at some point you will be asked under which CC-license you would like your article to be published. These licenses determine how someone may use your work. The idea is that publications can be copied and distributed more easily and/or that others can elaborate on them.

There are a number of different Creative Commons licenses. EUR mandates her researchers to opt for the CC-BY license when possible. Note that funders can also set requirements when it comes to licenses. For more information on the different kind of licenses go to Creative Commons Licenses.

A CC BY license allows users to share (copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format) and adapt (remix, transform, and build upon the material) for any purposes, also commercially. However, users must attribute you (unless you have specifically said that you do not want to be attributed) and clearly indicate if changes have been made to your original work.

Additionally, CC licenses contain a ‘no endorsement, no sponsorship’ clause, which explicitly states that users may not imply that the original author supports or endorses their reuse of the work.

The term ‘commercial use’ refers to the fact that an organization intends to obtain a commercial advantage and possibly aims for financial remuneration. It is tempting to immediately think about large multinationals like Shell, Google, Amazon, but actually a non-commercial license (CC BY-NC) prevents all revenue-generating organizations from reusing your work.

This includes cultural or educational institutions like schools, museums or universities. Even those nowadays cannot rely exclusively on public funding and have to rely in part on their own revenues.

As such, the use of a NC license precludes a large pool of organizations and institutions from reusing your work, thus possibly reducing its impact and visibility. No matter what commercial party is reusing the material, the intended reuse may not necessarily be a bad thing.

Definitions

Also known as: postprint, AAM, accepted manuscript, author accepted manuscript, accepted author manuscript.

This is the final version of the manuscript after formal peer-review but before being type-set by the publisher. It contains all revisions made during the peer-review process. Many publishers only permit Green Open Access if it is not the publisher's version-of-record that is self-archived, but rather a version that does not feature the publisher's own formatting and logo.

The Sherpa Romeo database an provide basic information on the extent to which articles from academic journals may be archived, as well as any embargo periods.

How to find it:

  • Search your email, computer hard drive, and cloud storage;
  • Contact your co-authors;
  • Log into the journal's submission page and retrieve a copy of the accepted version of your article;
  • Contact the journal by email and ask for a copy of the accepted version of your article.

 

Also known as: published version, version of record, VOR.

This is the version of the manuscript published in a journal with the journal's type-set and branding. When dealing with hard-copy publications, this is the printed version found in books and journals. In the digital environment, the published version is usually a PDF available through the publisher’s website or through article databases.

On the basis of the Taverne Amendment, the publishers' versions of short scientific works can be made available after six months via the university repository.

How to find it:

  • Log into the journal's submission page and retrieve a copy of the published version of your article.

Journal articles (‘refereed’ and ‘non-refereed’), book chapters, conference papers and annotations.

Predatory publishers abuse the Open Access model by collecting publication costs without providing proper editorial and peer review services. You can often recognize predatory publishers by their aggressive marketing strategies and spam emails. Yet, predatory journals may look legitimate at first sight.

Check out our tips for recognizing predatory journals. In addition, you can find recommendations on the website of the initiative Think, Check, Submit.

The lists below may provide useful information for researchers who have doubts about the intentions of a particular journal. These lists do not necessarily represent the opinion of the librarians of Erasmus University. We recommend that scholars read the available reviews, assessments and descriptions and then decide for themselves whether they want to submit articles, serve as editors or on editorial boards.

We emphasize that journals change in their business and editorial practices over time. These lists are kept up to date to the best extent possible but may not reflect sudden, unreported, or unknown enhancements.

"Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access publishers" from Scholarly Open Access: Critical analysis of scholarly open-access publishing

"Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access journals" from Scholarly Open Access: Critical analysis of scholarly open-access publishing

Beall's List of Suspicious Journal and Publishers 

 

Open Access Regulation

For the Q&A regarding the Open Access Regulation, go to MyEUR.

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