Minor Port Management and Maritime Logistics

Category
Broadening minor
Minor code
FEB53107M / FEB53107
Duration
10 weeks

Content 

Rotterdam is renowned as one of the largest port and shipping centers of the world. The port of Rotterdam is situated in one of the most competitive port regions in the world. Internationally, the port and city are famous for its large scale port development projects, sustainability, engagement with stakeholders, and cluster governance, entrepreneurship and proactiveness towards embracing new technologies. This Minor broaden the horizon of students towards the highly dynamic world of shipping, ports and transport.

This minor offers bachelor students the possibility of understanding the processes underlying international transport networks from an economics, operations and management perspective. It is an opportunity to learn about international and maritime transport, terminal and port management, intermodality and hinterland transport, and the interrelationship between port and region from a multidisciplinary perspective.

In this minor three main topics will be discussed:

  • Maritime Economics, which deals with the transportation of goods by sea.
  • Port Economics and Management, which deals with the economics and management of seaports.
  • Container Logistics and Inland Network, which deals with container logistics from a door-to-door perspective
  • Port-city relationships

Students are challenged to use and integrate the knowledge from these modules in case assignments. This minor brings students in close encounter with port and maritime professionals. Students take advantage of learning from the port of Rotterdam, engage with both academia as well as professionals from the port and terminal companies.

Learning objectives

This minor aims to broaden the horizon of student by presenting them a holistic perspective on maritime and   port economics and management. The courses and assignments focus on the challenges for the port and maritime industries to undergo 4 major transitions: energy transition (renewable energy), raw materials transition (circular economy), digital transition and social transition. Ports play an important role in contributing to reducing CO2 emissions to virtually zero by 2050, which necessitate the port to explore and develop into new techniques,  new players and partnerships and new value propositions and business models.

Overall course objectives are:

  • Understanding of the processes that underlie port management and maritime logistics from an economics, operations and management perspective.
  • Undertake a policy analysis of a port (development) company strategy.
  • Make a basic simulation model and assess the competitive position of a port towards its hinterland.
  • Develop a sustainable and/or digital business model for a port (development) company;
  • Undertake an integrative methodology to assess the role of ports and maritime companies towards sustainable transport.
  • Critically assess the interaction and interdependencies between ports and its regions.

Special aspects

Curiosity counts

This is a broadening minor, which means this minor requires a curious and inquisitive mind on the world, such as geopolitics, international trade but also societal debates on sustainability and climate action.

Language

However, a proficiency in English, both verbal as in writing is a prerequisite to write papers.

Digital skills

A good command in Excel is recommended, but not a prerequisite.

Class attendance

Tutorials are mandatory

Off campus activities

Off campus activities may consist of a visit to the World Port Days, a port excursion, visits to companies and maritime museum.

Overview modules

Module 1: Maritime Economics

  • EC: 3
  • Content:  Maritime economics is the branch of economics that deals with the transportation of goods by sea. The learning goal of this module is to offer the students’ knowledge and insight in the economic structure of the maritime industry. In particular, the lecture cycle will address demand for ocean shipping, the determination of prices, the origins of revenue and costs, and the consequences of cost structures for specialization in activities in shipping. The module will highlight the role of containerization in the maritime transport. At the end of the module students should have some idea of how to make money in this industry, as well as understand the behavior of some of the major players. In addition, they should be able to formulate the requirements of shipping companies from the perspective of port management.
  • Teaching method: Lectures, workshops and written exam.
  • Teaching materials: A selection of chapters from the book: Stopford, M., (2009), Maritime Economics (2009, 3rd edition). New York: Routledge (also available as e-Book via catalogue of the Erasmus University Library), and additional papers indicated on Canvas before the course.
  • Contact hours: 2 hours per week.
  • Self study: 9 hours per week.

Module 2: Port Economics and Management

  • EC: 3
  • Content: The aim of this module is to provide student with theoretical and applied knowledge on seaports from an economic and management perspective. In this module we focus on ports as element in international supply chains and the locations of in general three economic activities, namely cargo transfer, (petro-) chemical industry, and logistics. One of the most important determinants for a port is its location in transport networks and the hinterland they serve. Besides the location of ports, port competition, port competitiveness and the performance of ports are relevant issues. Special attention is given to the role of the port authority and its activities. Next to these topic the course will provide theoretical and applied knowledge about the relationship between ports and regional economic development.
  • Teaching method: Lectures, excursion, workshops and written exam
  • Teaching materials: A selection of articles and literature will be indicated on Canvas before the course.
  • Contact hours: 2 hours per week.
  • Self study: 9 hours per week.

Module 3: Container logistics and Inland Network

  • EC: 3
  • Content: The introduction of the container had an enormous impact on production and distribution networks.  The production of goods became globalised, while distribution systems were able to interact more efficiently with each other. This module provides a conceptual and applied approach to container logistics and the port–hinterland relationships. The module aims at highlighting recent developments in the inland container networks. A network can be defined as a system of locations (seaports, inland regions) or nodes (deep-sea terminal or inland terminal) and linkage between those nodes via road, rails and waterway. In this module every part of the network will be discussed, combined with insights from recent research. Special attention is paid to the increasing role of digitisation in world-wide supply chains, being one of the major trends in container logistics.
  • Teaching method: Lectures, excursion, workshops and written exam
  • Teaching materials: A collection of articles and literature will be indicated on Canvas before the course.
  • Contact hours: 2 hours per week.
  • Self study: 9 hours per week.

Module 4: Integration Case

  • EC: 3
  • Content: The integration case consists of a number of tutorials. These tutorials will be used to reflect on the major transitions in the port and maritime industry: sustainability, energy transition and digitization.  By integrating knowledge from all lectures and guest lectures, student will work out a report in teams of 3 students.

    The report of the integration case will have to clearly distinguish 3 parts: (1) understanding the market and analysis of leading supply chains, (2) understanding of port competition, (3) synthesis. Each of these parts will have a dedicated section with a review of relevant literature. In the synthesis, the findings from the analyses are brought together into a well-structured report which can be handed over to the Port of Rotterdam and other relevant stakeholders.

  • Teaching method: Lectures, workshops and written exam
  • Teaching materials: Assignments and some articles and literature that will be indicated on Canvas before the course.
  • Contact hours: 2 hour per week.
  • Self study: 9 hours per week.

Module 5: Port City Case (only for students who choose to take the 15 EC minor)

  • EC: 3
  • Content: Many ports around the world struggle with the relation with their parent-city. The tensions which occur on the interface between port and city is often caused by the scarcity for space, but also about a transition from traditional to new purpose, e.g. a shipyard which is now used as an innovation campus. Port functions may change over the life span of a spatial area, which lead to deterioration and decay, which subsequently could lead to conflicts between stakeholders. On the contrary, this tension could also lead to creativity, if coordinated well. Shared value is a relatively new concept which involves creating economic value while also creating value for society and the entire port-city ecosystem. The assignment is to develop a ‘port-city instawalk’ which takes you into the port, but particularly on a discovery on the boundaries between port and city.
  • Teaching method: Lectures, site visits and assignment
  • Teaching materials: A collection of articles and literature will be indicated on Canvas before the course.
  • Contact hours: 2 hour per week.
  • Self study: 9 hours per week.

Overview content per week

Week

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Remark

Kick-off at World Port Days

S

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Port Excursion

 

E

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lectures Maritime Economics

L

L

L

L

L

L

 

 

 

 

 

Lectures Port Economics

L

L

L

L

L

L

 

 

 

 

 

Lectures Containter Logistics Inland networks

L

L

L

L

L

L

 

 

 

 

 

Integratie case

S

 

T

 

T

 

 

X

 

 

 

Port City Case

S

 

 

 

 

T

 

 

 

X

 

Written exam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Questions & Answers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S=Start; T=Tutorial; X= exam or submission date.

Examination

Method of examination

All students will follow the 3 modules. There will be one (digital) exam, which will be composed of three parts, one for every module. The minimum grade for the exam is a 4.5.  A lower grade cannot be compensated.  Next to the exam there is an integration case. The students will work on the case in a team of 3 students. Students are free to compose their own teams. The integration paper will be assessed by means of a rubric which will be made available upfront via Canvas.

Students who opt for the 15 EC variant need to make the port-city assignment. Also this assignment will be assessed by means of a rubric, which will be made available upfront via Canvas.

The grade for the exam and every assignment needs to be at least a 4.5. A lower grade cannot be compensated. You will have to take a resit of the exam for those parts for which you have a grade below 4.5. A final grade of 5.5 is sufficient to pass the minor.

You will have to take a resit of the exam for those parts for which you have a grade below 4.5. A lower grade can never be compensated.

Composition of final grade

12 EC Minor:

 

Written Exam

Case

Assessment

Modules:

Maritime Economics (ME)

Port Economics & Management (PEM)

Container Logistics & Inland Networks (CLIN)

Integration Case

Weight

50%

50%

 

15 EC Minor:

 

Written Exam

Cases

Assessment

Modules:

Maritime Economics (ME)

Port Economics & Management (PEM)

Container Logistics & Inland Networks (CLIN)

Integration Case (80% of cases)

 

 

Port City Case (20% of cases)

Weight

50%

50%

Feedback

During the programme, we will set up tutorials, in which we will actively engage with the work-in-progress. The tutorials are specifically used to provide guidance and allow for questions to make sure students get intermediary feedback during the writing process. For these tutorials we require preparatory work from the students. We will use templates to steer the discussions during class.

In Canvas, students receive feedback by means of transparent evaluation criteria in the rubric.

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

Contact information

M. Jansen, MSc
m.jansen@ese.eur.nl
+31 10 4081578

Faculty website
https://www.eur.nl/upt/over-erasmus-upt/staf/maurice-jansen

Category
Broadening minor
Minor code
FEB53107M / FEB53107
Duration
10 weeks
Organisation
Erasmus School of Economics
Study points (EC)
15
Instruction language
English
Location
Campus Woudestein, Rotterdam

Registration

Please read the application procedure for more information.