Decision

When you’ve done all the tests and gone through the exercises, you’ll have more insight into:

-          choice factors that are important for you
-          your personality/your pitfalls
-          your interests
-          interesting sectors and programmes
-          your learning style(s)
-          what type of person you are and what career suits you
-          your work values

You’re now almost at the point of making a final choice. Check once more that all the information you’ve collected matches the impression you made for yourself. If you still have any doubts, you can go back to the exploration and deepen understanding phases.

In order to reach a final decision, use the assignments below to compare the programmes that you now have on your list.

Assignments

Go directly to:

T model

This model is a decision-making technique you can use to make a choice between two or more studies.

Study A

Positive aspects

mark

Negative aspects

mark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total:

 

Total:

 

negative - positive =

 

 

Study B

Positive aspects

mark

Negative aspects

mark

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total:

 

Total:

 

negative - positive =

 

Step 1:
Place one of the studies at the top of the model. There is space below to write the positive and negative aspects of the study. When doing so, try to think of all the aspects involved in the study, such as the content (courses), study difficulty, location of the university or university of applied science, the atmosphere in the programme etc.

Do this with the second option too.

Step 2:
When you have done this for both studies you want to compare, you can indicate how important each aspect is. Award a mark to each aspect, awarding marks from 1 to 10. Give an aspect a mark 10 when it is very important and a mark 1 if an aspect is not or is hardly important, and of course everything in between.

Step 3:
Then, for the first study, add all points from the positive column followed by those from the negative column. Then check the results by deducting the negatives from the positives. This will give you your final mark. Do the same with the columns for the second study. You can then compare these two final marks. The marks can be high, low or even negative. The difference between these two marks says something about which of the two studies you find more appealing. But what is more important is that you have really thought a lot about all the aspects associated with the studies, both positive as well as negative aspects. And also that you have thought about how important certain arguments actually are.

Consider:

-         When you’ve only been able to think of positive aspects for a certain study, take into account that this could mean that it is either a very good option, or you do not yet want or cannot yet see the negative aspects. Investigate which of the two is true.

-          Also take into account that nobody enjoys a study for 100%. That’s not realistic. There are always areas that are less interesting. If you come out at 75-80%, that’s good. If you only find it 50% appealing, think hard about whether it’s wise to choose this study.

 

Choose with your heart and head
Compare the programmes that you have on your list now in order to reach a final decision. You’ll probably want to take various factors into account: choose with your head as well as your heart.

You can use the table below for this.

Important features

Weight factor

Study A

Study B

Study C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 
Enter the programmes that you currently have on your list.

In the left column, indicate which features of a programme you find important. In the 2nd column, indicate which weight factor you want to award to these features.

Then give every programme a mark per feature and multiply this mark by the weight factor. Then calculate the score per programme.

Example:

Important features

Weight factor

Study A

Study B

Study C

Interesting

4

8(*4)

7(*4)

9(*4)

Matches my qualities

3

6(*3)

6(*3)

4(*3)

Good job perspective

2

4(*2)

8(*2)

7(*2)

Great city

1

8(*1)

3(*1)

6(*1)

Total

 

66

65

68

 

Action plan

The goal of producing an action plan including time planning is to take steps so that you can make a final choice. Decide for yourself what you need now to make your final choice. What are you still missing? Do you need to talk with someone, are you missing specific information about a programme or...? In the diagram below, note what you still need to chase up and the actions you’ll take for this, the desired result and when you will carry out these actions.

Write focused plans, not general ideas.
Keep the plans you make realistic and achievable, and especially CONCRETE.
And remember to stick to your plan.
If you have completed your plan in its entirety and you are still not able to make a choice, simply produce a new action plan.

 

What do you need  to make your final choice?

   Action

When: date/time

1.

2.

3.