Research

Our current research activities focus on the following areas:

Genoeconomics

This newly emerging research field was co-founded by researchers working at or being affiliated with EURIBEB. At the intersection of molecular genetics and microeconomics, research in this field aims at three goals: First, to identify specific genetic factors that are responsible for the observed heritability of many economic preferences and outcomes. Second, to identify the many ways in which individual behavior and social institutions moderate or amplify genetic differences. And third, incorporating genetics into economic analysis to help economists identify and measure important causal pathways (which may or may not be genetic). Our research in this field has until now focused on educational attainment, subjective well-being, and self-employment.

Genetic epidemiology

Studying the role of genetic factors in determining health and disease, and the interplay of such genetic factors with environmental factors, genetic epidemiology can integrate insights from economics and genoeconomics to better understand causal pathways leading to health outcomes. Until now, our research within EURIBEB has focused on cognitive ability among children, cognitive health among elderly, and possible health implications of self-employment.

Neuroeconomics

Combining methods from neuroscience and behavioral economics, neuroeconomics seeks to understand human decision making. Researchers at EURIBEB employ methods developed in neuroeconomics to further investigate the causal pathways implicated by genetic discovery studies.

Psychological markers and economic behavior

This line of research is entirely new and is inspired by the EURIBEB setup: collaboration between schools of EUR and taking entrepreneurship as the "test" phenotype. It focuses on the relation between psychological markers (i.e., validated psychiatric symptom scores) such as attention deficit and hyperactivity (ADHD) symptoms and economic, non-clinical, behavior like entrepreneurship. Knowledge of this relation could advance the field of occupational choice as well as that of psychology, and physical and mental well-being (happiness). A mismatch between the real occupational choice and the one predicted by a psychological profile may be detrimental to one’s mental and physical well-being (happiness). In this research line, neuroscience techniques such as electroencephalography (EEG) are employed to study their association with these psychological markers. This research line is in a very early stage of development.