Finance & Accounting

This research programme aims to perform high quality research that enhances understanding of the functioning of financial markets, financial institutions and intermediaries, as well as the financial decision making of firms, managers and market participants. The programme strives for high quality scientific contributions in five areas:

  • Corporate Finance;
  • Corporate Governance;
  • Financial Markets;
  • Financial Accounting;
  • Management Accounting.

The programme’s mission is to be one of the leading finance and accounting programmes in Europe, by performing research of high academic quality and at the same time producing results with relevance for a broad audience in the finance and accounting profession.

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Programme leaders

Key publications

  • Skaife, Veenman & Wangerin (2013) Internal control over financial reporting and managerial rent extraction: evidence from the profitability of insider trading. Journal of Accounting and Economics, 55(1), 91-110.
  • Gryglewicz, S. (2011). A Theory of Corporate Financial Decisions with Liquidity and Solvency Concerns. Journal of Financial Economics, 99(2), 365-384.

Quality

As one element of the programme’s overall aim, the target is to be consistently ranked among the top European finance and accounting programmes in terms of the number of tier 1 publications. Its performance in this respect has significantly increased during the reporting period, especially when looking at the absolute top journals in Finance and Accounting. Fully in line with Erasmus School of Economics’ overall strategy, the programme recognises the importance of research collaborations and international networks as elementary to performing high quality research. Therefore, our researchers often attend high quality international conferences and visit prestigious academic institutions around the world, such as New York University and Stanford University. We organise a high quality seminar series with speakers from leading universities to provide opportunities for collaborations and to learn from the very best. For instance, New York University professor David Yermack is a regular visitor to our department.

Relevance to society

As the other element of the programme’s overall aim it considers transfer of actionable knowledge to practitioners essential in its daily work. The recent financial crises and accounting scandals provide ample evidence for the importance of our fields for society, and for the need to make sure that advanced techniques for finance and accounting developed in universities are properly understood in other parts of society. Our programme uses several methods to disseminate its research results to the rest of society. First of all, an important element of creating societal impact is the education of students. With more than 500 students in the Master programme, the knowledge created by the programme makes a very substantial contribution to society as the basis of a curriculum that educates many future business leaders. In addition, the Finance and Accounting programme has organised highly focused conferences and round tables that also involve influential practitioners. Furthermore, members of our research programme regularly contribute opinion pieces to Dutch and international newspapers. One aim of these activities is to contribute our expertise to inform the public debate, for example, about executive remuneration, insider trading or the peculiarities of investing in art. Finally, a relatively large number of members has an appointment at a leading financial institution or an auditing firm besides the position at Erasmus School of Economics. This creates excellent opportunities to build collaborative projects and stimulate interactions between fundamental academic research on the one hand and the (financial) industry and regulators on the other.