The Evolution of International Order: How to Understand the Global Crisis of the 21st Century

Categorie
Verbredende minor
Code
MINESHCC-6
Tijdsduur
10 weken

Content 

The 21st century is mired in crisis and conflict that beg further exploration of the theory and history of international relations. For example, why does Trump’s America impose tariffs on allies whilst spending $32 million per hour on the global War on Terror? How is the global financial crisis related to the rise of nativist movements in the West? Why don’t one million Uyghurs in Chinese internment camps cause as much public outrage as 245 inmates of Guantanamo Bay? And why can’t the global community come together to resolve the climate crisis?

This minor draws on history and political science to offer students a historical perspective and conceptual and theoretical frameworks through which they may start to explore, examine and grasp the complex global challenges that societies face today. Modules focus on the origins and evolution of international society; on the development of capitalism and globalization as we know it today; and on the history and theory of peace and international conflict

Learning objectives

After completing the minor, students:

  1. will be able to survey the evolution of international relations 1500-present.
  2. be able to evaluate the conceptual and theoretical frameworks to explore, examine and understand international society, the global economy and peace and conflict.
  3. will be able to appraise the historical roots and political foundations of diplomacy within contemporary international relations.
  4. will be able to analyse the development of capitalism as a historical process that emerged from political choices, geopolitical competition, business cultures and technological transformation.
  5. will be able to assess cases of violent conflict and peace-making, 1500-present, and locate them in their appropriate historical and political contexts.

Special aspects

• The education level for the minor is BA-3.
• The maximum number of students is 60.
• Proficiency in spoken and written English is essential. We advise a VWO-final examination grade of 7 or higher, a TOEFL-test minimum score of 100 or an IELTS-test minimum score of 7.

Overview modules

Module 1: War & Peace

  • Code: CH9011
  • EC: 5
  • Content: War and peace-making are two major features of international interaction. On the one hand this course examines conflict and war over the past 500 years from the perspective of a variety of historical actors, from dynasties to states and from politicians to terrorists. The examination includes reflections on what, if anything, makes war just, as well as the evolution of the conduct of war. On the other hand this course explores the processes of peace making and peace keeping by global, regional, national and local actors, 1500-present. This module provides students with an understanding of the main theories of conflict and peace and enables them to apply theory to historical and contemporary case studies of violent conflict and of peace processes.
  • Teaching method: Seminars
  • Teaching materials: Articles via the University Library and online resources
  • Contact hours: 8 weeks, 3 hours per week
  • Self study: 12.8 hours per week (116 hours in total)

Module 2: The International System

  • Code: CH9012
  • EC: 5
  • Content: This module provides an introduction to the development of the international political system from 1500 to the present. The focus is on the highest, systemic level: the practice of international politics, its main actors, the rules, assumptions, understandings and norms that underpinned said practice, and how all of these changed over time. Particular attention will be paid to key moments in international history, such as peace conferences, global encounters, major wars and international institution-building, from the encounters of separate civilisations in the 1500s to today’s global governance.
  • Teaching method: Seminars
  • Teaching materials: Articles via the University Library and online resources
  • Contact hours: 8 weeks, 3 hours per week
  • Self study: 12.8 hours per week (116 hours in total)

Module 3: International Political Economy

  • Code: CH9013
  • EC: 5
  • Content: The state and the market have been key organising principles of social order since the rise of capitalism as the dominant political-economic system in the fifteenth century. This course analyses the complex and dynamic relationships between state and market against the background of geopolitical and historical change. On the basis of an understanding of state-market relationships as historically contingent aspects operating as part of a wider international political economy, the course investigates the diverse manifestations of state and market under capitalist order. The course focuses on the evolution of the state-market interaction by addressing topics such as the rise of the Company State and mercantilism, the fiscal-military state, imperialism, forms of development, varieties of capitalism in the post-World War II era, and the rise of neoliberalism.
  • Teaching method: Seminars
  • Teaching materials: Articles via the University Library and online resources
  • Contact hours: 8 weeks, 3 hours per week
  • Self study: 12.8 hours per week (116 hours in total)

Overview content per week

CH9011: War & Peace

Seminar 1: Introduction: the Problem of the Recurrence of War.

Seminar 2: Dynasty, Succession, Reunion: European Warfare, 1648-1799.

Seminar 3: European Military Expansion and the World (1500-1800).

Seminar 4: Revolutions, Napoleon, and the Vienna Settlement: the Globalisation of European Conflict.

Seminar 5: The Era of the World Wars.

Seminar 6: Nuclear Revolution & Arms Control.

Seminar 7: Global Cold War.

Seminar 8: “New Wars” and Counterinsurgency.

CH9012: The International System

Seminar 1: Introduction: What is the International System?

Seminar 2: Global encounters, 1500-1800.

Seminar 3: The Westphalian System.

Seminar 4: The Origins of the Liberal Order.

Seminar 5: The Post-1945 World Order: Liberal Internationalism.

Seminar 6: The Post-1945 World Order: the Rise of the Global South.

Seminar 7: The Post-Western World: the View from the North.

Seminar 8: The Post-Western World: the View from the South.

CH9013: International Political Economy

Seminar 1: Introduction: IPE and the State-Market Relationship.

Seminar 2: East India Companies.

Seminar 3: The European Fiscal-Military State.

Seminar 4: Rule Britannia.

Seminar 5: The New Leviathan.

Seminar 6: Pathways of Development.

Seminar 7: Varieties of Capitalism.

Seminar 8: Neoliberalism, Globalisation and Crisis.

Examination

Method of examination

CH9011: War & Peace:

2 Learning journal assignments and 1 primary source analysis.

CH9012: The International System:

2 Learning journal assignments and 1 blog.

CH9013: International Political Economy:

2 Learning journal assignments and 1 response paper.

Composition final grade

CH9011: War & Peace:

Learning Journal Assignment 1 (20%).

Learning Journal Assignment 2 (20%).

Primary source Analysis (60%).

CH9012: The International System:

Learning Journal Assignment 1 (20%).

Learning Journal Assignment 2 (20%).

Class Blog (60%).

CH9013: International Political Economy:

Learning Journal Assignment 1 (20%).

Learning Journal Assignment 2 (20%).

Response Paper (60%).

Feedback

Students receive formative feedback to all submitted assignments.

Part of the seminars will be dedicated to providing advice and feedback on assignments.

Summative feedback will be provided after the final assessment in an end of course review.

Student blogs

Contact information

Mark Edward Hay
Hay@eshcc.eur.nl
+31104082509
room: M6-40

Faculty website
https://www.eur.nl/people/mark-hay
 

Categorie
Verbredende minor
Code
MINESHCC-6
Tijdsduur
10 weken
Organisatie
Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication
Studiepunten (EC)
15
Voertaal
Engels
Locatie
Campus Woudestein

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