(Brett) B.E. Ory MSc

(external) researcher Erasmus School of Social and Behavioural Sciences Department of Public Administration and Sociology (DPAS).
Location
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Room
-
Telephone
Email
ory@essb.eur.nl

Latest academic publication

B.E. Ory, R. Keizer & P.A. Dykstra (2017). Does Educational Similarity Drive Parental Support? Journal of Marriage and Family, 79 (8), 947-964. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jomf.12413[go to publisher's site]

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Brett Ory (1985) is a PhD candidate at the Department of Sociology of Erasmus University Rotterdam.

Under the supervision of prof. dr. Pearl Dykstra (Erasmus University Rotterdam) and prof. dr. Renske Keizer (Erasmus University Rotterdam and University of Amsterdam), Brett is studying the conditions under which men care for their children and aging parents, with a focus on the role of national policies and norms. Her research interests include family sociology and cross-national research.

In 2013 Brett completed a research master in Sociology and Social Research at Utrecht University, where she studied the way national context influences the well-being of widows across Europe under supervision of dr. Tim Huijts (Queen Mary University of London).

Brett's current work focuses on the practical and emotional care men provide for their families. It is often recognized that fathers and sons are crucial to healthy family functioning and, as a result, many European governments have designed policies intended to encourage men’s involvement with their families. In particular, many countries are implementing paternity leave policies designed to both encourage father involvement in the family and support women’s return to the labour market after childbirth. Much is still unknown about what makes one father different from another, or how men’s caring behaviour is influenced by the national context. One research question this project will address is how national policies and norms influence the amount of time men spend with their minor children. Other potential avenues of research are the determinants of adult sons’ care for their ageing parents, and the link between being a caring father and being a caring son. This project aims to shed light on differences in men’s family behavior across Europe and how national policies and family structure influence men’s caring responsibilities.