Erasmus Economics & Theology Institute

Towards decent economics

Towards decent economics

We believe in decent economics, in which we care for people, planet, and profit.

The Erasmus Economics and Theology Institute (EETI) is a research and knowledge center where theologians, economists, philosophers and business administrators challenge beliefs, ideas, concepts and motives that are at the core of our economy.

As this is a time of transition, societies have to find new ways in order to balance people, planet and profit. The need for change, on a planet that has finite limits, implies that science has to question the fundamentals.

Man is a complex being. Circumstances and societies change over time, but we, basically, stay the same. We learn something and call it progress, whereas other ideas fall into oblivion. Our lives evolve around needs and capabilities, on a rational, emotional, biological and spiritual level. Our economies and societies reflect who we are, what we believe, and what we aspire.

Economists & Theologians

Economists can learn from theologians since many practices in economy have been analysed and described throughout history. Trust, leadership, power, justice, reciprocity, and responsibility, to name just a few, have been studied extensively by the humanities. Adopting the tension and complexities of contemporary society, our research on the origins of ideas starts in the present.

On the other hand, theology and beliefs have been influenced by the economic and social surroundings and developments at the time. Our world is different now. Economics can shed new light on the ancient notions that are at the root of religious scriptures. 

We Trust. We Care. We Build.

Theologians examine the human experience of faith and the nature of the divine. They work with scriptures that have been written long ago, as a roadmap for life. Philosophers study the fundamental nature of reality and existence. Economists study how society uses its limited resources, looking at the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Together, they can enhance our knowledge and understanding of economics.

 

 

All images courtesy by Riccardo Budini.