Prof. Xandra Kramer selected as member of the KNAW

The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW) has selected Prof. Xandra Kramer (1971) as a member based on her outstanding scientific achievements. Instalment of the nineteen new Academy members takes place on Monday 16 September.

The KNAW has around 550 members. Members of the KNAW are leading scientists from all disciplines. The instalment entails a lifelong membership to the KNAW. The KNAW is the forum, voice and conscience of science in the Netherlands. With their research and collections, the institutes of the KNAW belong to the (inter)national scientific top. At the basis of all its activities is the conviction that knowledge and creativity are the most essential ingredients for well-being and prosperity.

Xandra is a pioneer in investigating civil procedural law in cross-border issues. Among other things, she contributes to the development of a European justice system that is easily accessible to everyone (Building EU Civil Justice).

Xandra Kramer is a professor of private law at Erasmus School of Law and a part-time professor of private international law at Utrecht University. She advises the European Parliament, the European Commission, the Ministry of Justice and Security and the Council for the Judiciary. She is also a substitute judge at the Rotterdam District Court.

Professor
Faculty
Erasmus School of Law
University
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Chair
European Civil Procedure
CV

About prof. Kramer

Xandra Kramer is professor of Private Law at Erasmus School of Law. She combines this position with a parttime (0,2) professorship in Private International Law at Utrecht University. In addition, she is a Deputy Judge at the District Court of Rotterdam.

She conducts research and lectures in the area of private international law, international litigation, comparative law, arbitration, mediation, and European private law and has published numerous articles and several books in these areas. She is particularly fascinated by the cross-roads between economic efficiency and procedural fairness, the actual functioning of civil justice systems and its impact on litigants, transnational complex litigation and enforcement, and the harmonisation of EU private international law and civil procedure. Her research combines doctrinal legal research, comparative law, policy-oriented and (qualitative) empirical research.