Current facets (Pre-Master)

Young (childless) women seem less ambitious than men

Young (childless) women seem less ambitious than men

Young women are more likely to start working part time soon after they finish their education than young men, even when they don’t have children yet.
 

62 percent of women aged 18 to 25 years don’t work full time, opposed to only 28 percent of men in this category. These conclusions emerge from research by The Netherlands Institute for Social Research.

Contrary to popular belief, it's not just mothers with young children who work part time. It counts for young women in general.

Independent women
Young people, especially aged between 30 to 34 years old, are likely to be financially independent. But the difference in Holland between men and women is bigger than anywhere else in Europe: 66 percent of women and 82 percent of men take care of theirselves.

Young women (18-30 years old) who work for the government make more money per hour than men. Still, their annual income is lower. Also, young women often are less economically independent than men this age. After earning their degrees, young men and women find a job equally often.

First jobs
Women are less satisfied with their first jobs than men. Also, they are less positive about their career prospects. These gender differences are especially large in commercial branches.