Euros for your organs?!

Lecture and debate on the (un)desirability of financial incentives for organ and blood donations
Speaker
University
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (USA)
Chair
Economics
Speaker
University
Utrecht University
Chair
Psychology
Speaker
Faculty
Erasmus MC
University
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Start date

Thursday, 14 Feb 2019, 19:30

End date

Thursday, 14 Feb 2019, 21:30

Location
Arminius, Rotterdam
Anatomic profile of the human upper body

Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Royal Netherlands Economics Association and Arminius Rotterdam organised evening on the pros and cons of the radical idea that paying for organs and blood donations might save thousands of patients.

Paying for organs or blood for transplantation purposes is quite a radical idea. Although forbidden in most countries in the world Mario Macis argues it should not be a taboo. Instead, we should debate the pros and cons, informed by solid scientific evidence on the efficiency and morality of compensating organ and blood donors. 

Dilemmas and questions

Are economic incentives for body parts the solution for the thousands of patients who are waiting for an organ or blood that will save their lives? Why would someone want to sell his organs or blood? How effective could this be? How come many of us find it hard to think of this and act, or is there a deep moral ground to it? Will the solution work in the long run? And will people still be altruistic if one gets paid for their most valuable belongings? Are there any good reasons (not) to implement this in Dutch law?

Speakers

Mario Macis gave a lecture based on the research he did in this area in the past decade which was published in among others Science and the American Economic Review. The lecture was followed by a discussion with Denise De Ridder and Eline Bunnink and a Q&A with the audience.

The event was moderated by Robert Dur, Professor of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam and President of the Royal Netherlands Economics Association (KVS).