Current facets (Pre-Master)

Why information overload makes you depressed

One out of eight people suffer from Burn Out
One out of eight people suffer from Burn Out

You can probably watch Orange is the New Black on Netflix while sending Snapchats to your friends and read some Wikipedia entries at the same time. While you are already making plans for your next summer holiday, sending some old school e-mails to your parents and scroll through pictures of the former lovers of your new partner. Whatever it is you do online, chances are you OD on information.

Information is merely a click away. Depending on your query, there’s likely at least a dozen, if not hundreds, of blogs on any topic, a similar number of books and even more articles to read. That’s a good thing, but it also can overburden your brains. Too much information can make you depressed.

According to Witte Hoogendijk, Professor of Psychiatry and Head of Department of Psychiatry, human beings are not able to cope with the amount of stress in this era of information overload. Stress used to be a very useful sign warning us for possible danger, like the sound of a snake or any other deadly animal. The world around changed rapidly, but our poor brains still operate as if we live in caves. Our stress system is not compatible with this world full of signals. No wonder so many people get depressed. With one in eight people suffering from Burn Out.

On Tuesday Night, 8 pm, Witte Hoogendijk explains his theory on the stress system in modern times. He is one of the three key note speakers at the Studio Erasmus. Scientists from Erasmus University are regular guests at this free live event, filled with the latest scientific research, music and interviews.

Where?
Tuesday 7th of  March 2017 | 20.30 – 21.45 uur| Foyer Rotterdamse Schouwburg| Free entry, reservations: www.sgerasmus.nl

Other guests: Eefje Steenvoorden (assistant professor Faculty of Social Sciences), Jos de Mul (Professor in Philosophical Anthropology), Tamar Fischer (Assistant Professor Erasmus School of Law – criminology) and Job Greuter (music).

 

Text: Manon Sikkel

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