Ramadan

Current facets (Pre-Master)

Hafida Sallouf student at ESL
Especially during Ramadan, it’s important to take the time to figure out how you can help people around you.
Hafida Sallouf
Student at Erasmus School of Law

During Ramadan, people often ask me ‘Why do you have to fast?’ Yes, Ramadan is an Islamic month of fasting, which lasts 29 to 30 days. But it’s also a very spiritual month, because you reflect on your religion, yourself and on how to become a better person in society. In other words, it’s a month where you put aside eating and drinking to work on a better you, so that you stay that way during the rest of the year.

To me, Ramadan means sharing time with family and friends. I actively try to introduce Ramadan to people and teach them what it means to me. I have a lot of friends who aren’t Muslim and I like inviting them over for dinner. It’s all about doing something good for someone else. That’s why especially during Ramadan, it’s important to take the time to figure out how you can help people around you. Like helping out your neighbours, spending more time with your parents, or forgiving that one person.

I have four brothers and a sister, so together with my parents, there are eight people in our household. We’re all busy with our studies, sports and jobs so normally we don’t have the time to eat together. But during Ramadan, we manage to sit around the table and we really take the time to be together and break the fast. What I like so much about Ramadan is reflecting on yourself and trying to be critical: what can I do for someone else? What can I improve? Am I being a good citizen? You become aware of what you are as a person and how strong you are.