PhD defence S.A.M. (Suzanne) Lambregts

On Thursday 19 December 2019, S.A.M. Lambregts will defend her PhD dissertation, entitled: ‘Long-term Outcome in Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury’.
Promotor
Prof.dr. G.M. Ribbers
Co-promotor
Dr. C.E. Catsman-Berrevoets
Co-promotor
Dr. M.E. Roebroeck
Start date

Thursday, 19 Dec 2019, 15:30

End date

Thursday, 19 Dec 2019, 17:00

Space
Senate Hall
Building
Erasmus Building
Location
Campus Woudestein

On Thursday 19 December 2019, S.A.M. Lambregts will defend her PhD dissertation, entitled: ‘Long-term Outcome in Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury’.

Acquired brain injury (ABI) in children and youth may cause a variety of long-term disorders in body functions (deficits) across motor, language, cognitive and behavioral domains which may have a negative impact on the life course of children and their families. Even years post onset deficits and problems may impair participation and health-related quality of life. Research regarding long-term limitations in participation and health-related quality of life in patients with ABI younger than 24 years is limited and so is insight in predictors of these meaningful outcomes. Identification of modifiable predictors provides the opportunity to intervene and potentially modify outcome. We showed that one out of three children with ABI had a poor neurological outcome two years post onset. Age-appropriate participation was restricted in half of the children with ABI regarding home and community living activities and psychosocial health is reduced compared to healthy peers. Even children with relatively good neurological outcome at discharge may suffer from serious and persisting consequences due to the immaturity of the young brain and the risk of disruption of ongoing psychosocial development. Children and youth with pre-injury developmental problems, more severe ABI (especially non-traumatic brain injury), persistent cognitive impairments and poor neurological outcome on the long term need close monitoring in order to detect problems and to offer timely intervention programs. Developing integrated care pathways placed in an appropriate timeframe are essential whereas child-directed and family-focused interventions in all phases of recovery are needed to support children and family to achieve optimal participation and health-related quality of life and to minimize family impact.

The public defence will take place at the Senatehall, 1st floor of the Erasmus Building, Campus Woudestein. The ceremony will begin exactly at 15.30 hrs. In light of the solemn nature of the ceremony, we recommend that you do not take children under the age of 6 to the first part of the ceremony.