dr. (Maarten) MAS Boksem

dr. (Maarten) MAS Boksem

Associate Professor of Marketing Management

Associate Professor RSM - Rotterdam School of Management Department of Marketing Management
Location
Burg. Oudlaan 50, Rotterdam
Email
mboksem@rsm.nl
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Profile

I have a broad interest in human behaviour and in how the brain orchestrates this behaviour. My research topics range from the neural mechanisms of performance monitoring to the effects of mental fatigue on cognition, to the effects of social status on behaviour, to the effects on hormones on decision-making, to whether we can use brain measurements from just a few individuals to say something about how the population at large will behave.

Over the last several years I have become interested in Neuroeconomics (the branch of neuroscience that studies decision-making), and what is now called Consumer Neuroscience (how knowledge of Neuroeconomics may tell us something about how groups of individuals may respond to persuasive…

I have a broad interest in human behaviour and in how the brain orchestrates this behaviour. My research topics range from the neural mechanisms of performance monitoring to the effects of mental fatigue on cognition, to the effects of social status on behaviour, to the effects on hormones on decision-making, to whether we can use brain measurements from just a few individuals to say something about how the population at large will behave.

Over the last several years I have become interested in Neuroeconomics (the branch of neuroscience that studies decision-making), and what is now called Consumer Neuroscience (how knowledge of Neuroeconomics may tell us something about how groups of individuals may respond to persuasive messages and how this might affect their choice behaviour). My main lines of research in these fields focusses on two central questions: can we predict market behaviour from brain activity (and do such neural measures add anything to more traditional measures), and do brain measurements reveal additional evaluative information about stimuli (persuasive messages such as commercials), which cannot be obtained through self-report measures? We find that it is indeed possible to predict the behaviour of large numbers of individuals in the population from brain data obtained from a limited number of students in our lab, and that these brain measures increase accuracy of predicting both individual and population behaviour compared to self-report measures alone. Moreover, we find that, using multivariate approaches to analyses of fMRI and EEG data, it is possible to extract information from the brain that reveals which emotions were elicited by the stimulus, which mental representations were activated, and how these emotions and representations predict preference and choice, both at the individual level, as well as in the population at large.

Address

Visiting address

Burg. Oudlaan 50 3062 PA Rotterdam

Postal address

Postbus 1738 3000 DR Rotterdam