Functional impairment and provisions

Studying with a functional impairment may entail a number of challenges. It is therefore important that you make an appointment as soon as possible with your study adviser to discuss what facilities you need to be able to study at EUR. Below you will find an overview of the most common functional impairments with tips on how to overcome potential limitations. Read these tips carefully before you have a first meeting with your study advisor. They can be used as a starting point when mapping out your needs. If you have good tips that can be added below, please let us know (mail to smf@eur.nl)!

  • A motor impairment can mean that the student has a locomotor system impairment or an impairment in controlling the locomotor system. This impairment can be congenital (for example a muscular disease) or not congenital (for example following an accident). In some cases, a motor impairment can be visible, but this is not always the case. These impairments can vary in intensity, cause and form. The impairment can result in reduced physical resilience as well as reduced mental resilience (for example, tiredness).

      • RSI
      • Partial or fully invalidity due to paralysis
      • Tremor
      • Ataxia
      • Spasticity
      • Athetosis
      • Amputation
      • Rheumatic disorders
      • Osteoporosis
      • Scoliosis
      • Hypotonia
      • Muscle inflammation
      • A student often has difficulty moving around: This can be because he or she has insufficient energy, pain on walking or uses a wheelchair. A lack of accessibility on campus and within buildings and education areas can thus create barriers.
      • Accessibility of the lifts: If a lift is broken when a student has a lecture, the student will be unable to access the required floor, even though the student is actually on campus!
      • Consequences of poor motor or fine motor functions:
        • Taking notes, doing written tests and assignments
        • Using a computer/laptop
        • Carrying out practical activities/practicum
      • Focus/concentration problems: The student can have problems focusing or carrying out several tasks at the same time.
      • Doing one thing for a longer period (standing, sitting, moving) can be painful/difficult.
      • Irregular attendance during lectures and tutorials due to pain and or reduced resilience.
      • Reserve some extra study time to prepares lectures and read your literature. Divide the subject matter into smaller sections so that you have time in between to process new information and to rest.
      • Create a schedule! A schedule can be very handy when you’re studying and you need to keep lots of balls in the air at the same time. Make sure you include breaks and times for fun things in your schedule! A schedule doesn’t need to be filled with only studying.
      • Always schedule additional empty blocks. On the days you feel well, you can use these blocks to do some work in advance, and on days you feel tired you can recuperate. This way you can make sure you don’t leave too much subject matter to the end (as this may be a time when you don’t feel great).
      • Arrange an afternoon to go over a new block with a co-student. Discover the campus together and find out which routes are best to take to get from one building to another. Combine these practical matters with something nice, by finishing with lunch or drinks.
      • If you have a group assignment, indicate clearly what you are able and unable to do. This will prevent any disagreement within the group, enabling you to focus all your energy on your part of the assignment.
      1. Provisions and measures
        Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
      2. Workshops, training sessions
        You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here
      3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
        A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues. For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
  • Auditory disorders are hearing disorders. These disorders vary in how they are manifested. People often immediately think of deafness, but that’s not the only impairment. Students with an auditory impairment can also have difficulty picking up high or low tones or can find loud noises painful. This impairment is often not visible, which means that communication problems can arise at first. The other person isn’t immediately aware that he/she needs to take something into account.

      • Deafness
      • Hearing loss
      • Ménière's disease
      • Tinnitus
      • Following lectures: It can be difficult to follow lectures. Students with an auditory impairment sometimes don’t hear what the professor or a co-student is saying. When they are able to do this, it takes so much energy that they are no longer able to focus on and read the PowerPoints. This means that students don’t pick up on all the information conveyed in various ways by the lecturer.
      • Spontaneous interaction: Students can prepare for lectures so that they know what to expect. It can be more difficult for them to follow spontaneous interaction and learning moments. Students are then dependent on the form of communication as to whether they can participate actively in the discussion.
      • Students will need different types of support to be able to follow the education offered at the university (for example visual support or a sign language interpreter).
         
      • Prepare for your tutorials and lectures in advance. Knowing something about the topics that will be discussed will make it easier for you to follow the teaching. You could ask your study advisor whether you can arrange with the lecturer that you receive the PowerPoints in advance of the lecture to make it easier to follow.
      • Ask your co-students whether you can exchange notes. This will enable you to check whether you picked up on the most important topics from the lecture. (They can also check their own notes straight away, because people sometimes miss things during lectures, even if they don’t have an auditory impairment).
      • Create a schedule. A schedule can be very handy when you’re studying and you need to keep lots of balls in the air at the same time. Make sure you include breaks and times for fun things in your schedule! A schedule doesn’t need to be filled with only studying.
      • As well as contacting your study advisor, it is advisable to contact the UWV. You can request a grant for a notetaker or sign language interpreter via the UWV.
      1. Provisions and measures
        Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
      2. Workshops, training sessions
        You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here
      3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
        A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues.
        For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
  • If someone has a visual impairment, they have no or limited sight. This can be a result of an eye disease or accident, for example.

      • Blindness
      • Limited field of vision
      • Limited depth perception
      • Colour vision deficiency
      • Restricted light-darkness adjustment
      • Combination of the above impairments
      • Communication problems: Students with a visual impairment sometimes miss non-verbal signals or body language during discussions. This means they can interpret information differently.
      • Following lectures: It can be difficult to follow lectures. Students with a visual impairment have difficulty reading slides. When they are able to do this, it takes so much energy that they are no longer able to focus on and listen to the lecture. This means that students don’t pick up on all the information conveyed in various ways by the professors.
      • Accessibility of educational material (the compulsory literature, but also additional literature or material that is needed when conducting research): Books are sometimes impossible to read if an extremely small font has been used. The use of digital books can offer a solution, but these are sometimes difficult to obtain. The study advisor can help you discover which options are available.
      • Reading: Reading is more difficult and takes a lot of energy, which means that the speed of reading is slower.
      • Campus accessibility and accessibility of buildings and lecture rooms.

      Energy problems as a result of the additional stress associated with the impairment.

      • Reserve some extra study time to prepares lectures and read your literature. Divide the subject matter into smaller sections so that you have time in between to process new information and to rest.
      • Arrange an afternoon to go over a new block with a co-student. Discover the campus together and find out which routes are best to take to get from one building to another. Combine these practical matters with something nice, by finishing with lunch or drinks.
      • If you have a group assignment, indicate clearly what you are able and unable to do. This will prevent any disagreement within the group, enabling you to focus all your energy on your part of the assignment.
      1. Provisions and measures
        Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
      2. Workshops, training sessions
        You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here.
      3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
        A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues.For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
  • Under the term chronic illness, we mean all illnesses that are chronic in nature. The associated limitations depend on the nature and seriousness of the disorder. The problems students face very much depend on the type of disorder. In general, students with a chronic illness suffer from reduced resilience. Following education is sometimes experienced as being very tiring, all the more so when hospital consultations and side-effects of medication play a role.

      • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
      • Rheumatism
      • Fibromyalgia
      • Lung diseases (such as asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis)
      • Crohn’s disease
      • Diabetes
      • Attendance during compulsory or non-compulsory tutorials and lectures
      • Concentration and energy problems (possibly caused by medication)
      • Reduced resilience
      • Stimuli/environmental factors (allergies, furniture, smoke)
      • The occurrence of symptoms is often unpredictable, making planning more difficult. This can also make working in groups more difficult
      • Prepare work in advance: If you suffer from a chronic illness, you won’t get better from one day to the next. Try to arrange your good days as effectively as possible, but don’t overdo things. By preparing in time for examinations or assignments, you can help ensure that you don’t miss deadlines if you suddenly become ill.
      • Leave plenty of space for fun things. It’s important that you also schedule fun things to do when you’re feeling well. Get to know your co-students better during drinks, for instance. (win-win situation: you’ll enjoy going to lectures more, and it will make it easier for you to ask for help when you’re feeling ill.)
      • Make sure your learning environment is good: If you have back complaints, make sure you use a good office chair. If you have allergies, find out which is the most dust-free study space. You can study more effectively in a good study environment, as you can concentrate better.
      • If you have a group assignment, indicate clearly at the start what you are able and unable to do. Make a clear division of tasks. Try to take on tasks in which you’re not dependent on the input of others. This will prevent you having to do your part at a time when you’re not feeling great.
      1. Provisions and measures
        Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
      2. Workshops, training sessions
        You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here.
      3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
        A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues.For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
  • There is a wide range of psychological disorders. Some characteristics are specific for a certain disorder, others are more general. What these disorders have in common is that these can lead to depression, tiredness and serious forms of stress or anxiety. It can be that students with this impairment have difficulty making and maintaining contacts, cooperating, and planning and organising activities.

      • Depression
      • Schizophrenia
      • Personality disorders
      • Eating disorders
      • Anxiety disorders
      • Burn-out
      • Concentration problems: These can arise as a result of the psychological impairment, be a consequence of insomnia, which is often linked to a psychological disorder, or be a side-effect of medication.
      • Students can be more temperamental as a consequence of poor sleep and reduced resilience. Their mood can change during a tutorial, with the student suddenly responding to a topic in an extremely expressionless way or, on the contrary, in a very expressive way.
      • Procrastination can result in students not completing their assignments in time. And as they lose the overview, it is also difficult for them to seek help in time.
      • Group assignments can be difficult because of the above-mentioned barriers. Students have little energy, have difficulty with deadlines and are sometimes temperamental, with discussions sometimes being experienced as personal attacks.
      • Reserve some extra study time to prepares lectures and read your literature. Divide the subject matter into smaller sections so that you have time in between to process new information and to rest.
      • If you have a group assignment, indicate clearly at the start what you are able and unable to do. Make a clear division of tasks. Try to take on tasks in which you’re not dependent on the input of others. This will prevent you having to do your part at a time when you’re not feeling great.
      • Ensure that you have a daily routine. Structure in your daily routine means you don’t have to put so much energy into thinking about your next task, which enables you to reserve energy to focus on a task.
      • Make a realistic schedule: If you notice that you have reduced concentration and following the teaching takes so much energy that it is impossible to study much on top of this, check whether there are options to take longer for your study, which will give you more space to breathe. It can provide more of a sense of calm if you follow one course per period and pass it, than to follow two courses and fail both.
      • Divide large assignments into smaller sections: If you have less energy and concentration, it is more difficult to complete a large task in one go. Make it easier on yourself and spread the assignment over a number of days. Make sure that you schedule breaks so that you can work in a focused way over shorter periods.
      1. Provisions and measures
        Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
      2. Workshops, training sessions
        You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here.
      3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
        A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues.For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
  • There are a lot of different development and learning disorders. Since we cannot explain every disorder in detail, you will find the four most common ones below

    • There are various forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASS). Autism is a development disorder, in which stimulus and information processing in the brain is disturbed. A diagnosis is made by a registered healthcare psychologist, psychotherapist or psychiatrist. Often - but not always - students with autism have difficulties in the following three areas:

      1. Verbal and non-verbal communications. Students often focus on factual information, and non-verbal signals are not always noticed. This means that students don’t always pick up on all the information that is given. For instance, they do not always recognise sarcasm.
      2. Social interaction and social communications.
      3. Capacity for fantasy and imagination.
        • Processing information (during lectures) is slower/more difficult. Some students find it difficult to distinguish main and secondary aspects and can easily get stuck on one detail.
        • Meeting deadlines: Students with autism can have a lot of difficulty distinguishing between main and secondary aspects. This means they can find it hard to return assignments in time, even though they have actively studied the study material.
        • Structured life: This does not only concern scheduling their learning, but also making a daily routine, planning journey time, etc. Students with autism find it difficult to create a schedule. However, structure does make things more manageable for them and is a tool to ensure that they do not become over-stimulated.
        • Group assignments: Students with autism often find it difficult to respond flexibly to unforeseen circumstances. Following a schedule and cooperating can also often present obstacles.
        • Active participation in tutorials: Students with autism often have difficulty with situations that do not have a clear structure, and they are less likely to use their initiative.
        • Arranging practical issues with respect to studying. Students with autism find it difficult to apply structure. This means that issues such as ‘enrolling for a resit’ or ‘sending a timely e-mail to the lecturer’ are difficult.
        • Concentration (because of over-sensitivity to stimuli and certain patterns of thinking).
        • During group assignments: Ensure that there is a clear division of tasks. You then know exactly what you are responsible for. Set some extra time aside for unforeseen circumstances.
        • Study with a timer. Decide for yourself how long you aim to work on the assignment, and set the timer. Initially, you will need much more time to complete your tasks after the timer has sounded, but you’ll notice that you increasingly learn how to estimate this better.
        • Prepare the lectures and tutorials well. If you already know something about the theme, you will be able to recognise and follow the lecturer’s central thread more quickly.
        • Use a noise blocker when you are studying. Using headphones (without music) can enable you to focus on your studies in peace and quiet and reduce the number of distracting stimuli.
        • Ask your co-students whether you can exchange notes. This will enable you to check whether you picked up on the most important topics from the lecture. (They can also check their own notes straight away, because people sometimes miss things during lectures, even if they don’t have autism).
        1. Provisions and measures
          Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
        2. Workshops, training sessions
          You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here. The Studying with Autism Spectrum Disorder workshop is also offered by the student counselling department twice a year.
        3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
          A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues. For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
    • ADD/ADHD are associated with focus and concentration problems, impulsivity and hyperactivity. ADD is only associated with focus and concentration problems. ADD/ADHD are diagnosed by a psychologist. Students with ADD/ADHD have difficulty planning and structuring their study material.

        • Students have difficulty focusing and find it hard to sit still for longer periods. This results in these students having problems with listening during lectures and tests.
        • Obtaining and maintaining overview, making plans and organising group assignments.
        • Estimating the required study time: this means that the student often starts too late, or is often busy with homework for longer than expected due to a lack of concentration.
        • Staying organised: Students with ADD/ADHD often lose assignments/items and forget to write down and meet deadlines.
        • Medication is not always the solution for all problems. Although the use of medication mitigates some of the symptoms, it is not the be all and end all. Some symptoms will continue to be manifested to some degree. Making adjustments to find the correct dose of medication is also associated with additional problems.
        • Study with a timer. Decide for yourself how long you aim to work on the assignment, and set the timer. Initially, you will need much more time to complete your tasks after the timer has sounded, but you’ll notice that you increasingly learn how to estimate this better.
        • Prepare the lectures and tutorials well. If you already know something about the theme, you will be able to recognise and follow the lecturer’s central thread more quickly.
        • Use a noise blocker when you are studying. Using headphones (without music) can enable you to focus on your studies in peace and quiet and reduce the number of distracting stimuli.
        • Ask a co-student to help every now and then: Check the deadlines.
        • Clear away your things and keep them in a fixed place. Place all literature, assignments and other loose papers for one course in one box so that you can always find it. On your computer, also place all forms for one course in a folder instead of storing everything in ‘my documents’.
        • Ask your co-students whether you can exchange notes. This will enable you to check whether you picked up on the most important topics from the lecture. (They can also check their own notes straight away, because people sometimes miss things during lectures, even if they don’t have ADD/ADHD).
        1. Provisions and measures
          Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
        2. Workshops, training sessions
          You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here. The Studying with ADD/ADHD workshop is also offered twice a year.
        3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
          A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues. For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
    • Students with dyscalculia have serious and persistent problems with learning to count. The exact cause of this problem is not known, but this condition is not linked to intelligence or poor education. It is likely that the disorder is hereditary and has a neurological cause. There are many forms of dyscalculia, the characteristics of which differ enormously. An education specialist or registered healthcare psychologist can diagnose the disorder.

        • Students with dyscalculia have difficulty with those maths activities in which other students rely on automated knowledge and skills: following different steps in complex calculation procedures, estimating, mental arithmetic and complex assignments.
        • This is also manifested in a lack of understanding of numerical data and connections.
        • Difficulty interpreting spatial presentation of numeric information.
        • Following step-by-step plans or recipes can pose additional problems for students. This also applies to working on big assignments where a large number of sub questions need to be answered.
        • Doing tests within a certain time. Students with dyscalculia find it more difficult to estimate time correctly.
        • Use formula and calculation cards when studying. This will help your brain in following certain routes.
        • Create your own step-by-step plan: If the above-mentioned cards are not sufficient, and you need to follow procedures or solve large sums, create a step-by-step plan with a co-student. Once you learn this step-by-step plan from memory, you can use it during examinations.
        • Use a calculator or speaking calculator
        • Study with a timer. Decide for yourself how long you aim to work on the assignment, and set the timer. Initially, you will need much more time to complete your tasks after the timer has sounded, but you’ll notice that you increasingly learn how to estimate this better.
        1. Provisions and measures
          Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
        2. Workshops, training sessions
          You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here.
        3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
          A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues. For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.
    • Dyslexia is a disorder that makes reading, spelling and writing difficult. This is not associated with a student’s level of intelligence. EUR has formulated a Dyslexia protocol that tests a student’s dyslexia statement, after which provisions can be allocated.

        • Following lectures: Students with dyslexia need more energy and time to read PowerPoints and, it is difficult for them to take notes during the lecture.
        • Studying and processing large amounts of study material.
        • Bringing structure when faced with new learning materials (answers to questions during tutorials or the complete answers to test questions).
        • Distinguishing nuances in multiple-choice questions.
        • Reading the question and interpreting the assignment correctly.
        • Written presentations/assignments (disorganised structure, incorrect sentence structure, spelling mistakes)
        • Doing written tests.
        • English language literature/education.
        • Use text to speech software. Request a Textaid account via smf@eur.nl.
        • Prepare the lectures and tutorials well. If you already know something about the theme, you will be able to recognise and follow the lecturer’s central thread more quickly.
        • Ask your co-students whether you can exchange notes. This will enable you to check whether you picked up on the most important topics from the lecture. (They can also check their own notes straight away, because people sometimes miss things during lectures, even if they don’t have dyslexia).
        • If you have a course with English literature, first familiarise yourself with the topic online by reading Dutch articles. If you already know something about the topic, the English will be easier.
        • Read printed literature with a pen/marker or another tool of your choosing. Colour in what you have read so you don’t lose the thread.
        • After every paragraph, write a summary of two sentences and mention the difficult/new concepts. This will also help you to prepare for your examinations: You will already have prepared a summary and definitions!
        1. Provisions and measures
          Currently, you need to contact your study advisor to discuss which provisions and measures you can use. An overview will also be posted here soon describing the kind of support EUR can offer. Provisions are, however, always allocated according to an individual student’s needs, and the Examining Board also approves the provisions to which you will be eligible.
        2. Workshops, training sessions
          You need many skills during and after studying. Student counselling organises various workshops. Take a look at their workshop calendar here
          The Studying with Dyslexia workshop is offered twice a year.
        3. Psychologist, counsellor, study advisor
          A diverse team is available at EUR to help you with various issues. For issues relating to your impairment, it is important that you contact your study advisor as soon as possible. If you come up against other problems, if would like to develop certain skills or if you have questions about your career, please visit our student support team website.